images veil
VEIL MINISTRIES
Behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent…
Matt. 27:51


GOOD FRIDAY 2019


HYMN: WHEN I SURVEY
Introduction: Intro When I survey (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab)  Words: Isaac Watts. The first two lines of the second verse paraphrase St Paul as recorded in Galatians 6:14, "But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ….”

Audio file
12 When I survey.mp3 (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
1
When I survey the wondrous cross
On which the Prince of glory died,
My richest gain I count but loss,
And pour contempt on all my pride.

2
Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
Save in the death of Christ my God!
All the vain things that charm me most,
I sacrifice them to His blood.

3
See from His head, His hands, His feet,
Sorrow and love flow mingling down!
Did e’er such love and sorrow meet,
Or thorns compose so rich a crown?

4
Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were a present far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all.


PRAYER
Audio file
Prayer Service Good Friday (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
O God, our heavenly Father, today we hesitate to come into your presence knowing that we are especially remembering what man did to your precious Son, Jesus. What amazing love you show us that you not only forgive us for such an indescribable sin, but you reassure us that we are welcome to come into your presence. So we come with reverence and awe to first of all tell you that we are so grateful that by placing our sin on Jesus, his death on the cross at Calvary paid the penalty for our sin. We find it hard to believe you could be so gracious but accept, with eagerness, your offer of salvation.
Today, as we remember the horror of the crucifixion of Jesus we marvel that he could maintain his mission to the world despite the suffering being so intense. How, we wonder, could any bystander not be convinced of your love, dear God, when they witnessed the forgiving words Jesus spoke as he hung on the cross. Knowing your willingness to reach out to those who continue to disregard your offer of salvation, we would, as we meet at the foot of the cross, ask that you will empower us with more determination to witness about the offer of salvation we have received and is offered to the world.
When we would fail you through serving you in our human strength alone, remind us, we pray, that your omnipotence is available to us. Encourage us, we ask, to remember that our weakness can be turned into strength when we make ourselves available to you completely.
And though we know that after the cross came the resurrection, teach us we pray, that nothing can ever take from you, dear God, the intensity of the agony you must have felt as Jesus suffered as he was crucified. So on this day of all days we want to say over and over again, ‘We’re sorry!” And we’ll try to show you just how much we mean by that by sharing the gospel with all we meet, even if they claim to be disinterested. May our earnestness compel interest, we pray.
As, in our minds, we experience the hours on the cross passing with ever greater agony for our Saviour we long to close our eyes to the cruelty and shut our ears to the sound of dying, especially as we know the suffering was for us.
May we ever remember the extent of your love as we ‘see’ the piercing of the side of Jesus - man’s ultimate refusal to hear your voice even when they hear the words, ‘Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.’
As we stand on this most sacred of ground, we ask once again your forgiveness and receive by your grace, dear God, your gift of loving forgiveness. In the name of Jesus, we pray these things. Amen

HYMN: THERE IS A GREEN HILL
Introduction: Intro There is a green hill (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) Cecil Frances Alexander (April 1818 – 12 October 1895) was an Anglo-Irish hymnodist and poet. She married the Anglican clergyman William Alexander, who afterwards became the Bishop of Derry and Archbishop of Armagh  

Audio file
There is a green hill (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
1.
There is a green hill far away,
outside a city wall,
where our dear Lord was crucified,
who died to save us all.

2.
We may not know, we cannot tell
what pains he had to bear;
but we believe it was for us
he hung and suffered there.

3.
He died that we might be forgiven,
he died to make us good,
that we might go at last to heaven,
saved by his precious blood.

4.
There was no other good enough,
to pay the price of sin;
he, only, could unlock the gate
of heaven and let us in.

5.
O dearly, dearly has he loved,
and we must love him too;
and trust in his redeeming blood,
and try his works to do.



CHORAL : WORTHY IS THE LAMB (‘Messiah’ –Handel)
Introduction:
Intro Worthy is the Lamb (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) Messiah was written in 1741 by George Frideric Handel. The libretto by Charles Jennens  is entirely drawn from the Bible, mostly from the King James Bible. 
The lyrics are taken from Revelation 5:12-14
Worthy is the Lamb that was slain, and hath redeemed us to God by his blood, to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. Blessing and honour, glory and power, be unto Him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb, for ever and ever.
Audio file :
Worthy is the Lamb (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 


BRASS: FOR OUR TRANSGRESSIONS
Introduction:
Intro For Our Transgressions (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) Composer: This meditative study was written by Morley Calvert
who focuses on the Scripture- ‘He was wounded for our transgressions and with his stripes we are healed.’
He uses the words ‘Out from his wounded side’ a phrase which opens the piece- ‘There is life for a look at the crucified One’, ‘The Wounds of Christ’ and ‘I shall know him’.

Audio file
For Our Transgressions (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
1. There is life for a look at the crucified one,
There is life at this moment for thee;
Then look, sinner, look unto him and be saved,
Unto him who was nailed to the tree.


Chorus
Look, look, look and live;
There is life for a look at the crucified one,
There is life at this moment for thee.


The wounds of Christ are open,
Sinner, they were made for thee;
The wounds of Christ are open,
There for refuge flee.


I shall know him, I shall know him,
When redeemed by his side I shall stand;
I shall know him, I shall know him
By the print of the nails in his hand.


HYMN: THE OLD RUGGED CROSS

Introduction:
Intro The Old Rugged Cross (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
The writer of the words, George Bennard, was a native of Youngstown, Ohio, but was reared in Iowa.  Bennard wrote the first verse of "The Old Rugged Cross" in 1912 as a response to ridicule that he had received at a revival meeting.

Audio file
The Old Rugged Cross (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
1
On a hill far away stood an old rugged cross,
The emblem of suffering and shame;
And I love that old cross where the dearest and
best
For a world of lost sinners was slain.

Refrain

So I’ll cherish the old rugged cross,
Till my trophies at last I lay down;
I will cling to the old rugged cross,
And exchange it some day for a crown.

2
O that old rugged cross, so despised by the world,
Has a wondrous attraction for me;
For the dear Lamb of God left His glory above
To bear it to dark Calvary.

Refrain

3
In the old rugged cross, stained with blood so
divine,
A wondrous beauty I see,
For ’twas on that old cross Jesus suffered and
died,
To pardon and sanctify me.

Refrain

4
To the old rugged cross I will ever be true;
Its shame and reproach gladly bear;
Then He’ll call me some day to my home far
away,
Where His glory forever I’ll share.

Refrain


BIBLE READING
Matthew 26: 14-16 (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
Then one of the Twelve—the one calledJudas Iscariot—went to the chief
priests 
 and asked, “What are you willing to give me if I deliver him over to you?” So they counted out for him thirty pieces of silver. From then on Judas watched for an opportunity to hand him over.



HYMN: ONCE ON A DAY
Introduction:
Intro Once on a day (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
Words: Albert Orsborn. Tune: ‘Love's Old Sweet Song’ which  is a Victorian Parlour song published in 1884 by composer James Lynam Molloy and lyricist G. Clifton Bingham.

Audio file
Once on a day (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
1. Once, on a day, was Christ led forth to die,
And with the crowd that pressed on him joined I.
Slowly they led him, led him to the tree,
And I beheld his hands no more were free.
Bound fast with cords, and this was his distress,
That men denied those hands outstretched to
bless.

Chorus
Sacred hands of Jesus, they were bound for me;
Wounded hands of Jesus, stretched upon a tree,
Ever interceding, mercy is their plea.
Their effectual pleading brings grace to me,
Redeeming grace to me.

2.
Hands that were scarred by daily fret and tear;
Hands quick to soothe the troubled brow of care;
Hands strong to smite the sins that men enthrone,
Yet never raised to seek or claim their own:
Dear hands of Christ! and yet men feared them
so
That they must bind them as to death they go.

3.
Hands that still break to men the living bread;
Hands full of power to raise again the dead,
Potent and healing, eager to reclaim,
Laid in forgiveness on one bowed in shame;
Say, wouldst thou bind, by pride and unbelief,
Those hands that compass all thy soul's relief?



BIBLE READING
Matthew 27:1-10 (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
Early in the morning, all the chief priests and the elders of the people made their plans how to have Jesus executed. So they bound him, led him away and handed him over to Pilate the governor.
When Judas, who had betrayed him, saw that Jesus was condemned, he was seized with remorse and returned the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and the elders. “I have sinned,” he said, “for I have betrayed innocent blood.”
“What is that to us?” they replied. “That’s your responsibility.”
So Judas threw the money into the temple and left. Then he went away and hanged himself.
The chief priests picked up the coins and said, “It is against the law to put this into the treasury, since it is blood money.” So they decided to use the money to buy the potter’s field as a burial place for foreigners. That is why it has been called the Field of Blood to this day. Then what was spoken by Jeremiah the prophet was fulfilled: “They took the thirty pieces of silver, the price set on him by the people of Israel, and they used them to buy the potter’s field, as the Lord commanded me.


CHORAL: SURELY HE HAS BORNE OUR GRIEF
Introduction Intro Surely he has borne (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) From Messiah by Handel: The words of Isaiah 53:4-5 “Surely He hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows! He was wounded For our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; the Chastisement of our peace was upon Him.”

Audio file
Surely he hath borne our griefs(To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 

BIBLE READING
Matthew 27: 45-54 (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
From noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”)
When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”
Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. The rest said, “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save him.”
And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.
At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life. They came out of the tombs after Jesus’ resurrection and went into the holy city and appeared to many people.
When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed, “Surely he was the Son of God!”



VOCAL SOLO THE MAN CALLED JESUS

sandra-entermann_20150325_0001-2
Soloist: Sandra Entermann


Intro The man called Jesus (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
We welcome our soloist, Sandra Entermann, who brings to us a modern song which captures the sense of amazement that the world could crucify the Jesus we know to be loving and so kind, healer of our infirmities and who offers himself as a sacrifice for us.

Audio file
The Man called Jesus (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 

All he did was save my life,
All he did was be my friend,
And then mend my broken heart
So that I could smile again;
Now they’ve taken him away
And I just can’t understand
Why they’ve treated him this way
Oh they must not know this man
No, they must not know this man called Jesus
He’s so gentle,He’s so kind,
What could he be guilty of?
Oh how could it be a crime
That he gave all his love?
Now the man who saved my life
Has been nailed upon a cross,
And the joy that he made mine
Without him we’d all be lost;
Oh they must not know this man called Jesus

Chorus
If they’d known him like I do,
If they’d felt his gentle touch,
If they’d only seen the love in his eyes;
Well I hope some day they will,
Then like me they’ll understand
What it is to know this man called Jesus

Will the morning ever come
And the night be left behind
Jesus is the only one
Who can bring the sun to shine;
Now I feel just like the sky
When the rain begins to start-
I can’t stop these tears I cry
From the pain that’s in my heart;
Oh they must not know this man called Jesus


SERMON
me0021-3-3
Dr Malcolm Westwood


SERMON (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
Our first Bible reading refers to Judas Iscariot. Through 2000 years and more the name of Judas is a byword for treachery and is held in derision. Virtually every name in the Bible has been given to a child throughout the years with the exception of the name, Judas. Even non-believers avoid the name.
Yet he was convinced enough by the message of Jesus to journey with him for three years.
It is sometimes suggested that he just became frustrated that the pace of change wasn’t what he wanted to see. The Jews had their nationalists who dreamed of power. What better opportunity could Judas have than to align himself to someone who had shown that he could work miracles. It has also been suggested that Judas might have been a Sicarii- a dagger bearer, the sort of nationalist who was prepared to use force to overthrow the hated Romans.
Judas by his actions tried to pressurise Jesus to hasten how he thought Jesus should act. He made the mistake of thinking he could change Jesus. Had he shown more patience he would have come to understand that it is Jesus who changes us.
But come with me in my thoughts into the upper room where Jesus and the disciples were, like all Jews, celebrating the Feast of Unleavened Bread.

Allow me to spend a little time giving the detail of the feast because it commemorated the greatest event in the history of the Jews-the deliverance from their slavery in Egypt.
Every item in the meal was highly symbolic.

The Israelites had to leave Egypt in a hurry. There was no time to bake their customary leavened bread. Dough without leaven cooks very quickly but provides something more like water biscuit than a loaf. In Jewish thought, leaven is therefore a symbol of corruption, representing something which deters people from immediate obedience to God’s instructions.For the preparation of the feast therefore it was necessary to search for and throw out of the house every scrap of leaven.The Passover lamb which was eaten takes its name from the last plague on the Egyptians. An angel of death walked throughout Egypt and slew the firstborn son in every house which did not have its lintel and posts of the doors smeared with the blood of a lamb.
There were also four items in every Feast of Unleavened Bread:-1-A bowl of salt water which reminded them of the tears shed while they were slaves in Egypt and of the salt waters of the red sea which parted for them as they escaped from the pursuing Egyptians. A piece of parsley or lettuce was dipped into the salt water and eaten.2- Bitter herbs which consisted of horseradish, chicory, endive, lettuce, etc which reminded them all of slavery and of the bunch of hyssop with which the blood of the lamb had been smeared on the door posts and lintels of their homes.

3. Paste called Charosheth which was a mixture of apples, dates, pomegranates peanuts-a reminder of the clay with which they had been compelled to make bricks in Egypt. Through it were sticks of cinnamon to remind them of the straw with which the bricks had been made.4. 4 cups of wine the four promises in Exodus 6: 6-7 :I will bring you out from the burden of the Egyptians.I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and with great acts of judgement.I will take you for my people.I will be your God.
So why do I list this description of the meal apart from it being an interesting piece of history? I do so because it was a deeply significant celebration for all Jews. It reminded them of how God’s hand had miraculously led them out of captivity. It was a deeply spiritual time of remembrance. So how, we might ask could Judas have had the thoughts that he did when he was with the other disciples and Jesus himself who was hosting the meal? Is it possible that someone in such a religiously charged atmosphere could have such awful thoughts?!
Yet many of us will perhaps admit of how in the middle of a service when God’s blessings are so obviously being received by many, our thoughts are far away and we have left the sacredness of the sanctuary still with thoughts of enmity against those who we feel have been unkind to us.
Let’s stay in that upper room for a little longer to hear Jesus say to his disciples “One of you will betray me.” That must have caused them some instant soul searching. But even so, Judas thinks he can hide his thoughts , ‘Surely not me, Master?!’
I can’t help but think that as the disciples each dipped his hand into the bowl with Jesus, it must have been a very personal sharing because Jesus is able to quite plainly say to Judas, “Yes, it is you.” Judas must have looked into the eyes of Jesus as he heard his words.
Had the other disciples overheard what Jesus said, Judas might have been fortunate to escape the clutches of them!
But still there’s a chance from Jesus for Judas. In verse 27 we read, ‘Then he took the cup , gave thanks and offered it to them, saying, ‘Drink from it, all of you. “
ALL of you! You’re included, Judas! When did Judas decide enough was enough?

Again I’m reminded of the times in our services when we go through the motions of reverence but the ground on which we stand is not holy. It is the shifting sand of a sinful world we have brought from the world into our church building as we remember the hurts and the temptations which we haven’t asked the Lord for his help to overcome them and where necessary asked for his forgiveness.
Too often I fear we stand where Judas stood and ask in horror. ‘Betray you-who me?!’ Yet we can be unwilling to let Jesus have his way in our life. We can immerse ourselves in our church life and seem on the surface to be God fearing followers but when we hear Jesus calling us to be obedient we can often by our actions reveal to God that we prefer our own way.
So it was with Judas. From a place where the miracle of God was remembered and thanks were offered as they sang a hymn, Judas decided that his way was better than God’s way. He left the company of the disciples and found his way to the Chief Priests to do exactly what Jesus had said he would do.

I’d really like to find some mitigating circumstances to put Judas in a better light than we usually view him. Could we perhaps put his treachery down to frustration at what he considered the slow pace of how he thought Jesus should be using his power to overthrow the Romans. Or was he just a greedy person who saw a chance of making some money by betraying Jesus.

Again, come with me to observe Judas when he went to the Chief Priests and see if the narrative says to you what it says to me.
Here are the words of Scripture once again:
(Judas)…went to the chief priests  and asked, “What are you willing to give me if I deliver him over to you?” So they counted out for him thirty pieces of silver. From then on Judas watched for an opportunity to hand him over.
On the face of it, they are words we’ve possibly heard many times. Yet there is something in the words which suggests to me something very revealing.
Judas said to the Chief Priests, ‘What are you willing to give me if I deliver him over to you.’ They didn’t reply, ‘Well give you thirty pieces of silver.”
Some people feel that Judas was prepared to betray Jesus whatever the financial gain and would have been prepared to accept whatever he was offered. But look at the narrative again…. ‘… the chief priests counted out for him thirty pieces of silver….’
Picture the scene…the chief priests watched Judas has ‘
they counted out…’ One by one….They didn’t just hand him over a bag of coins. The counted the coins….one, two, three……..how many would they have to count out before Judas was satisfied? How much did it cost to buy his betrayal? When did they see his look of acceptance on his face. Did the counting become slower as the chief priests realised they were getting nearer to the point which would convince Judas it would be worth it …..25…..26….27……..28………29……………30! Done!
There have been many suggestions as to how much that would be worth in today’s money. It’s not really possible to do that for a number of reasons. The best calculation can be made by considering what a certain figure could purchase then and today. One calculation is that the 30 pieces of silver would be anything up to half a years wages of a soldier. Certainly it was not an insubstantial sum. As we read later it was enough to purchase a field.
So did the chief priests see at last the lips of Judas salivating as they reached 30 pieces of silver. It’s said that every man has his price. I suggest the time Judas had spent with Jesus who he must have known loved him lay heavy on him as he considered if it really was worth it. And he reached the point as the money was raised more and more and more. Judas reached the price where he could be bought.
Before we dismiss him as a greedy money making traitor not worthy of any consideration, perhaps we should reflect on the times when
we may have let Jesus down. Our price may not have been in stark money terms but perhaps we have decided that we will serve Jesus only on our terms rather than his. We, too, have wanted to change Jesus to do things our way rather than allowing him to change us so that we can do his will in his way.

We now fast forward to the moment when Judas realises he has miscalculated his strategy. Jesus wasn’t persuaded to use his miraculous powers to escape the charges against him. Judas must have astonished and distraught that things weren’t working as he expected.
‘When Judas, who had betrayed him, saw that Jesus was condemned, he was seized with remorse…….’
It doesn’t say he repented. He was sorry his plan wasn’t working out! He wanted to turn the clock back. ……’
After being with Jesus and the other disciples so recently celebrating and remembering what God had miraculously done for the nation he still thought he could determine events better himself but…… seized with remorse he returned the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and the elders who laughed in his face.
But as so many of us have found, we can’t undo what we’ve done wrong. We can be forgiven if we repent before God but Judas was still taking the human approach-he decided to sort his mistake out himself. He took the coins back to the chief priests and elders and said to them “I have sinned, for I have betrayed innocent blood.”
He knew what he’d done but still he didn’t return and throw himself on the love and mercy of Jesus. What did he do?
Realising what he’d done and how catastrophically it was turning out, Judas went away and hanged himself.
And when he couldn’t have his own way, he left Jesus to suffer.
Judas didn’t wait to see the extent of the love of Jesus as he suffered on the cross.
This is what Judas was too cowardly to wait to see.
Pilate had Jesus flogged. He was stripped and flogged with a leather lash which had in it metal tags which literally took chunks of flesh out of the back of Jesus. Then when Jesus had been whipped to within an inch of his life he was expected to carry his cross to the place of crucifixion. Jesus who knew how to handle wood as a carpenter, stumbled so much that a bystander, Simon of Cyrene was pressed into helping him. Would such a scene have disappointed you, Judas? Would you have expected Jesus to call down angels to petrify the soldiers and they would have to let him go?

But you thought your way was better than God’s way. But it didn’t matter to you, did it. You knew nothing about it. You’d hanged yourself! You were out of it!
Then the governor’s soldiers took Jesus into the Praetorium and gathered the whole company of soldiers around him. They stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him, and then twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on his head. They put a staff in his right hand. Then they knelt in front of him and mocked him. “Hail, king of the Jews!” they said. They spit on him, and took the staff and struck him on the head again and again. 
3After they had mocked him, they took off the robe and put his own clothes on him. Then they led him away to crucify him. That’s what your treachery helped to achieve, Judas.
Why is it that so many never learn that ignoring the way of Jesus results in disaster.

On Friday from noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”)
When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”
Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. The rest said, “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save him.”
And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.
At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life. They came out of the tombs after Jesus’ resurrection and went into the holy city and appeared to many people.
When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed, “Surely he was the Son of God!”
O Judas why weren’t you there to hear those words. Even after you realised the mistake you’d made, in your remorse, could you not at least have summoned up the courage to let Jesus know you were sorry. You missed a cross conversion-the centurion who believed!
But you didn’t witness that.
Yes, watching Jesus crucified would have been indescribable but you missed him promising a robber a place in Paradise- and that’s more than you have!
You missed Jesus asking for his Father to forgive the people who were responsible for what they were doing to him because they didn’t understand what they were doing. Judas, did you really know what you were doing? After spending three years with Jesus and never seeing him unwilling to forgive anyone, why would you think he would not forgive you, Judas? And you’ll never know the joy of the robber and the soldier because you hanged yourself before Jesus was crucified. Jesus told you very clearly ‘woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born.’ He didn’t say that because forgiveness would be withheld if it was requested with true repentance. Jesus knew what it does to a man who deliberately rejects him.
I wouldn’t want anyone to dwell unnecessarily on the abject horror of the cruelty and the indescribable pain Jesus suffered on the cross but we need to look on him there, hanging with the nails hammered into him and the gouged hole in his side by a spear so that we will want to love him enough to do all that he asks us to do for him. Judas you didn’t see what Jesus did for you. If you had, you wouldn’t have taken your own life.

Just one more word Judas. Had you been there at Calvary, you would have discovered how much Jesus loved you and indeed needed you to help to build his kingdom. But if that miracle of love was unimaginable, if only had waited three days longer you would have been amazed and thrilled by discovering what you wanted to believe was true-that nothing is impossible with God as shown by how Jesus was restored to life.

I can’t help Judas-and neither can anyone else but to all who are listening to me today, can I ask you to come to the cross and ‘yes’, look on the blood-stained Jesus as he dies to be your Saviour. Sense he’s dying there for you because he really loves you. Will you tell him that you love him and tell him that you will do all he asks you to do. Don’t worry about being asked to do something for him which you feel not capable of doing because in three days time, you’ll discover nothing is impossible to God! But that’s for later! Right now, experience the amazing love which is flowing from Jesus to you even as his life ebbs away. As he hangs on the cross, he’s showing you how much he loves you.
May I ask that as we hear the music of Stainer’s ‘For God so loved the world’, you might just kneel and thank Jesus for dying for you and once again promise that you will do all he asks you to do.


CHORAL: FOR GOD SO LOVED THE WORLD (Stainer)
Introduction ‘The Crucifixion’ is a Meditation on the Sacred Passion of Jesus. It is an oratorio composed by John Stainer in 1887. He intended the piece would be within the scope of most parish church choirs. It is based on John 3:16-17
For God so loved the world
For God so loved the world (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 

BENEDICTION (To hear the audio file please right click mouse, then left click to open new tab) 
May the blessings of an all loving, omnipotent God, the presence of Jesus our Saviour and the empowering of the Holy Spirit be with you this day and forevermore. Amen






To comment on the service,
please e mail mw@veilministries.org